Dong quai

Chinese: 当归

Pinyin: Dāng Guī

Parts used: Dried root

TCM category: Tonic herbs for Blood Deficiency

TCM nature: Warm

TCM taste(s): PungentSweet

Organ affinity: Spleen Heart Liver

Scientific name: Angelica sinensis

Other names: Female ginseng, Chinese angelica

Use of dong quai (Dang Gui) in TCM

Please note that you should never self-prescribe TCM ingredients. A TCM ingredient is almost never eaten on its own but as part of a formula containing several ingredients that act together. Please consult a professional TCM practitioner, they will be best able to guide you.

Preparation: At the end of fall, the root is picked and cleaned. It is left to dry slightly, bundled into small pieces and smoked slowly. After that it is washed, cut into thin slices and dried.

Dosage: 6 to 12g

Main actions according to TCM*: Tonifies the Blood. Lubricates the Intestines. Relieve constipation. Promotes circulation and dispels Bi Pain. Reduce Dysmenorrhea and help with irregular menstruation.

Primary conditions or symptoms for which dong quai may be prescribed by TCM doctors*: Irregular menstruation Anemia Amenorrhea Dysmenorrhea Constipation Arthralgia Abdominal pain

Contraindications*: Not for those with diarrhea, abdominal distention caused by Dampness or those with Yin Deficiency with Heat signs.

Common TCM formulas in which dong quai (Dang Gui) are used*

Xia Ru Yong Quan San

Source date: 1840 AD

Number of ingredients: 11 herbs

Formula key actions: Nourishes Blood. Increases breast milk supply.

Dang Gui is a king ingredient in Xia Ru Yong Quan San. Like the name indicates, it means it has more power than other ingredients in the formula.

In Xia Ru Yong Quan San, Dang Gui nourishes and invigorates Blood

Read more about Xia Ru Yong Quan San

Sheng Yu Tang

Source date: 1336 AD

Number of ingredients: 6 herbs

Formula key actions: Tonifies Qi and Blood. Preserves the Blood.

Dang Gui is a king ingredient in Sheng Yu Tang. Like the name indicates, it means it has more power than other ingredients in the formula.

In Sheng Yu Tang, Dang Gui is warming and moistening. It enters the Liver and Heart to tonify and invigorate the Blood. It also moistens the Intestines and regulates the dynamic between the Liver (movement) and Kidneys (storage).

Read more about Sheng Yu Tang

Tiao Gan Tang

Source date: 1827 AD

Number of ingredients: 7 herbs

Formula key actions: Nourishes Kidney and Liver Yin.

Dang Gui is a king ingredient in Tiao Gan Tang. Like the name indicates, it means it has more power than other ingredients in the formula.

In Tiao Gan Tang, Dang Gui nourishes and invigorates Blood

Read more about Tiao Gan Tang

Xiong Gui Er Chen Tang

Source date: 1575 AD

Number of ingredients: 7 herbs

Formula key actions: Resolves Damp-Phlegm. Nourishes Blood.

Dang Gui is a king ingredient in Xiong Gui Er Chen Tang. Like the name indicates, it means it has more power than other ingredients in the formula.

In Xiong Gui Er Chen Tang, Dang Gui nourishes and invigorates the Blood 

Read more about Xiong Gui Er Chen Tang

Dang Gui Di Huang Yin

Source date: 1640 AD

Number of ingredients: 7 herbs

Formula key actions: Nourishes Blood. Tonifies Kidney and Liver Yin. Regulates the menstrual cycle.

Dang Gui is a king ingredient in Dang Gui Di Huang Yin. Like the name indicates, it means it has more power than other ingredients in the formula.

In Dang Gui Di Huang Yin, Dang Gui nourishes Blood and strengthens the Uterus

Read more about Dang Gui Di Huang Yin

Ren Shen Dang Gui Tang

Source date: 1742 AD

Number of ingredients: 6 herbs

Formula key actions: Tonifies Qi and Blood. Nourishes Yin.

Dang Gui is a king ingredient in Ren Shen Dang Gui Tang. Like the name indicates, it means it has more power than other ingredients in the formula.

In Ren Shen Dang Gui Tang, Dang Gui nourishes Blood. Blood is a Yin element. 

Read more about Ren Shen Dang Gui Tang

Xiao Tiao Jing Tang

Source date: 1742 AD

Number of ingredients: 7 herbs

Formula key actions: Remove Blood Stagnation. Nourishes Blood. Calms the Mind.

Dang Gui is a king ingredient in Xiao Tiao Jing Tang. Like the name indicates, it means it has more power than other ingredients in the formula.

In Xiao Tiao Jing Tang, Dang Gui nourishes Blood.

Read more about Xiao Tiao Jing Tang

Xiao Yao San

Source date: 1107 AD

Number of ingredients: 6 herbs

Formula key actions: Harmonizes the function of Liver and Spleen. Relieves Liver Qi stagnation. Nourishes the Blood.

Conditions targeted*: HepatitisCholecystitis and others

Dang Gui is a deputy ingredient in Xiao Yao San. This means it helps the king ingredient(s) treat the main pattern or it serves to treat a coexisting pattern.

In Xiao Yao San, Dang Gui works together with White peony roots, the other deputy in this formula, to nourish Blood. This nourishing role also in turn helps strengthen the Liver since it stores Blood and is nourished by it.

Read more about Xiao Yao San

Si Wu Tang

Source date: 846 AD

Number of ingredients: 4 herbs

Formula key actions: Restores and nourishes Blood. Stimulates Blood circulation.

Conditions targeted*: Menstrual crampsIrregular menstruation and others

Dang Gui is a deputy ingredient in Si Wu Tang. This means it helps the king ingredient(s) treat the main pattern or it serves to treat a coexisting pattern.

In Si Wu Tang, Dang Gui enters the Liver and Heart to tonify and invigorate the Blood.

Read more about Si Wu Tang

Juan Bi Tang

Source date: 1178 AD

Number of ingredients: 9 herbs

Formula key actions: Tonifies and harmonizes the Protective and Nutritive Qi. Dispels Wind. Eliminates Dampness.

Conditions targeted*: Periarthritis of the shoulderRheumatoid arthritis and others

Dang Gui is a deputy ingredient in Juan Bi Tang. This means it helps the king ingredient(s) treat the main pattern or it serves to treat a coexisting pattern.

In Juan Bi Tang, Dang Gui works together with White Peony root (Shao Yao), another deputy here, to nourish the Blood and harmonize the Nutritive Qi, thereby facilitating the dispelling of the pathogenic Qi.

Read more about Juan Bi Tang

Gui Pi Tang

Source date: 1529 AD

Number of ingredients: 12 herbs

Formula key actions: Tonifies and nourish Qi and Blood. Tonifies Heart and Spleen.

Conditions targeted*: Nervous exhaustionMyasthenia gravis and others

Dang Gui is a deputy ingredient in Gui Pi Tang. This means it helps the king ingredient(s) treat the main pattern or it serves to treat a coexisting pattern.

In Gui Pi Tang, Dang Gui tonifies the Blood and regulates women's menstruations.

Its combination with Milkvetch root (Huang Qi), one of the key herbs in this formula, is very effective in generating and tonifying the Blood.

Read more about Gui Pi Tang

Tong Ru Dan

Source date: 1826 AD

Number of ingredients: 6 herbs

Formula key actions: Tonifies the Qi and Blood. Removes Stagnation from the breast connecting Meridians.

Dang Gui is a deputy ingredient in Tong Ru Dan. This means it helps the king ingredient(s) treat the main pattern or it serves to treat a coexisting pattern.

In Tong Ru Dan, Dang Gui nourishes Blood and supports the flow os Body Fluids.

Read more about Tong Ru Dan

Tao Hong Si Wu Tang

Source date: 1291 AD

Number of ingredients: 6 herbs

Formula key actions: Tonifies Blood and regulates the Liver. Moves Qi and Blood in the lower abdomen. Stops pain.

Conditions targeted*: Scanty menstruationPainful menstruations and others

Dang Gui is a deputy ingredient in Tao Hong Si Wu Tang. This means it helps the king ingredient(s) treat the main pattern or it serves to treat a coexisting pattern.

In Tao Hong Si Wu Tang, Dang Gui is warming and moistening. It enters the Liver and Heart to tonify and invigorating the Blood.

Read more about Tao Hong Si Wu Tang

Wen Jing Tang

Source date: 220 AD

Number of ingredients: 12 herbs

Formula key actions: Warms the Uterus and vessels. Nourishes Blood. Dispels Cold. Dispels Blood Stagnation.

Conditions targeted*: Dysfunctional uterine bleedingUterine hypoplasia and others

Dang Gui is a deputy ingredient in Wen Jing Tang. This means it helps the king ingredient(s) treat the main pattern or it serves to treat a coexisting pattern.

In Wen Jing Tang, Dang Gui nourishes and invigorates Blood, which is necessary because the obstruction of the Uterus by Cold prevents new Blood from taking its proper place there. It also regulates the menstruation, tonifies the Yin and regulates the Liver.

Read more about Wen Jing Tang

Ren Shen Yang Rong Tang

Source date: 1174 AD

Number of ingredients: 14 herbs

Formula key actions: Tonifies Qi and Blood. Nourishes the Heart. Calms the spirit.

Conditions targeted*: AnemiaNonhealing ulcers and others

Dang Gui is a deputy ingredient in Ren Shen Yang Rong Tang. This means it helps the king ingredient(s) treat the main pattern or it serves to treat a coexisting pattern.

In Ren Shen Yang Rong Tang, Dang Gui supports White peony root in nourishing the Blood.

Read more about Ren Shen Yang Rong Tang

Ba Zhen Tang

Source date: 1326 AD

Number of ingredients: 10 herbs

Formula key actions: Tonifies and augments Qi. Tonifies and augments Blood.

Conditions targeted*: AnemiaHepatitis and others

Dang Gui is a deputy ingredient in Ba Zhen Tang. This means it helps the king ingredient(s) treat the main pattern or it serves to treat a coexisting pattern.

In Ba Zhen Tang, Dang Gui nourishes Blood and therefore helps reinforcing the action of the king ingredient Shu Di Huang (Prepared rehmannia).

Read more about Ba Zhen Tang

Xue Fu Zhu Yu Tang

Source date: 1830 AD

Number of ingredients: 11 herbs

Formula key actions: Invigorates the Blood. Dispels blood Stagnation. Spreads the Liver Qi. Unblocks the channels.

Conditions targeted*: Coronary artery diseaseRheumatic valvular heart disease and others

Dang Gui is a deputy ingredient in Xue Fu Zhu Yu Tang. This means it helps the king ingredient(s) treat the main pattern or it serves to treat a coexisting pattern.

In Xue Fu Zhu Yu Tang, Dang Gui invigorate the Blood. However, its focus more on the lower part of the body. It also nourishes the Blood. 

Read more about Xue Fu Zhu Yu Tang

Bu Zhong Yi Qi Tang

Source date: 1247

Number of ingredients: 10 herbs

Formula key actions: Tonifies Qi of the Spleen and Stomach (Middle Burner). Raises the Yang. Detoxifies. Lifts what has sunken.

Conditions targeted*: Chronic hepatitisArrhythmia and others

Dang Gui is an assistant ingredient in Bu Zhong Yi Qi Tang. This means that it either serves to reinforces the effect of other ingredients or it moderates their toxicity.

In Bu Zhong Yi Qi Tang, Dang Gui tonifies the Qi in the Blood.

Read more about Bu Zhong Yi Qi Tang

Bai He Gu Jin Tang

Source date: 1573 AD

Number of ingredients: 10 herbs

Formula key actions: Nourishes Lung and Kidney Yin. Lubricates the Lung and clears phlegm.

Conditions targeted*: Chronic bronchitisChronic pharyngitis and others

Dang Gui is an assistant ingredient in Bai He Gu Jin Tang. This means that it either serves to reinforces the effect of other ingredients or it moderates their toxicity.

In Bai He Gu Jin Tang, Dang Gui , together with White peony roots, another assistant herb, nourish the Blood to support the Yin. Also they together protect the Lungs from violation thanks to their action of calming the Liver.

Read more about Bai He Gu Jin Tang

Qing Wei San

Source date: 1336 AD

Number of ingredients: 5 herbs

Formula key actions: Drains Stomach Fire. Cools the Blood. Nourishes the Yin.

Conditions targeted*: StomatitisPeriodontitis and others

Dang Gui is an assistant ingredient in Qing Wei San. This means that it either serves to reinforces the effect of other ingredients or it moderates their toxicity.

In Qing Wei San, Dang Gui reduces swelling and alleviates pain by harmonizing the Blood.

Read more about Qing Wei San

Du Huo Ji Sheng Tang

Source date: 650 AD

Number of ingredients: 15 herbs

Formula key actions: Anti-rheumatic, clears Wind, Cold and Damp Stagnation. Strengthens the function of the Liver and Kidney. Tonifies Qi and Blood.

Conditions targeted*: Chronic lower back painSciatica and others

Dang Gui is an assistant ingredient in Du Huo Ji Sheng Tang. This means that it either serves to reinforces the effect of other ingredients or it moderates their toxicity.

In Du Huo Ji Sheng Tang, Dang Gui works together with Szechuan lovage roots (Chuan Xiong)Unprepared Rehmannia (Di Huang) and White peony roots (Bai Shao), other assistants in this formula, to nourish and invigorate the Blood

Read more about Du Huo Ji Sheng Tang

You Gui Wan

Source date: 1624 AD

Number of ingredients: 10 herbs

Formula key actions: Warms and tonifies Kidney Yang. Replenishes the Essence. Tonifies the Blood.

Conditions targeted*: Nephrotic syndromeOsteoporosis and others

Dang Gui is an assistant ingredient in You Gui Wan. This means that it either serves to reinforces the effect of other ingredients or it moderates their toxicity.

In You Gui Wan, Dang Gui tonifies the Blood and nourishes the Liver.

Read more about You Gui Wan

Er Xian Tang

Source date: 1950 AD

Number of ingredients: 6 herbs

Formula key actions: Nourishes Yin and tonifies Yang of the Kidneys. Clears Empty Heat. Regulates the Directing and Penetrating Vessels.

Conditions targeted*: Perimenopausal syndromeEssential hypertension and others

Dang Gui is an assistant ingredient in Er Xian Tang. This means that it either serves to reinforces the effect of other ingredients or it moderates their toxicity.

In Er Xian Tang, Dang Gui moistens and nourishes the Blood and regulates the Penetrating and Governing Vessels.

Read more about Er Xian Tang

Sang Piao Xiao San

Source date: 1116 AD

Number of ingredients: 8 herbs

Formula key actions: Regulates and tonifies the Heart and Kidneys. Stabilizes the Essence. Stops leakage.

Conditions targeted*: Pediatric enuresisDiabetes and others

Dang Gui is an assistant ingredient in Sang Piao Xiao San. This means that it either serves to reinforces the effect of other ingredients or it moderates their toxicity.

In Sang Piao Xiao San, Dang Gui nourishes the Blood and Yin. Together with the other ingredients in this formula, it regulates and tonifies the Qi and Blood, which is essential for revitalization to occur.

Read more about Sang Piao Xiao San

Long Dan Xie Gan Tang

Source date: 1682 AD

Number of ingredients: 10 herbs

Formula key actions: Clears Heat and Fire from the Liver and Gallbladder. Clears and drains Damp-Heat from the Lower Burner.

Conditions targeted*: FurunclesPurulent otitis and others

Dang Gui is an assistant ingredient in Long Dan Xie Gan Tang. This means that it either serves to reinforces the effect of other ingredients or it moderates their toxicity.

In Long Dan Xie Gan Tang, Dang Gui nourishes the Blood without causing Stagnation to counteract the effect of the bitter, drying herbs in the formula.

Read more about Long Dan Xie Gan Tang

Tian Wang Bu Xin Dan

Source date: 16th century

Number of ingredients: 14 herbs

Formula key actions: Nutritive tonic: Nourishes Yin, Blood and Vital Essence of the Heart and Kidney. Clears away pathogenic Heat, clears Deficient Heat. Sedative.

Conditions targeted*: Perimenopausal syndromeChronic urticaria and others

Dang Gui is an assistant ingredient in Tian Wang Bu Xin Dan. This means that it either serves to reinforces the effect of other ingredients or it moderates their toxicity.

Read more about Tian Wang Bu Xin Dan

Jia Wei Xiao Yao San

Source date: Ming dynasty

Number of ingredients: 10 herbs

Formula key actions: Clears Liver and Spleen Qi Stagnation. Tonifies Spleen. Clears Deficient Heat. Nourishes the blood.

Conditions targeted*: InfertilityMenorrhagia and others

In Jia Wei Xiao Yao San, Dang Gui works together with White peony roots, the other deputy in this formula, to nourish Blood. This nourishing role also in turn helps strengthen the Liver since it stores Blood and is nourished by it.

Read more about Jia Wei Xiao Yao San

Gua Lou San

Source date: 1826 AD

Number of ingredients: 8 herbs

Formula key actions: Remove breast carbuncle (mastitis) after birth giving.

In Gua Lou San, Dang Gui nourishes and moves Blood

Read more about Gua Lou San

Tuo Li Xiao Du San

Source date: 1548 AD

Number of ingredients: 11 herbs

Formula key actions: Draws out toxicity. Expels pus from the interior. Tonifies Qi and Blood.

In Tuo Li Xiao Du San, Dang Gui nourishes and invigorates Blood

Read more about Tuo Li Xiao Du San

Ge Xia Zhu Yu Tang

Source date: 1830 AD

Number of ingredients: 12 herbs

Formula key actions: Invigorates Blood. Eliminates Blood Stagnation below the diaphragm. Stops pain. Promotes Qi movement.

Conditions targeted*: AmenorrheaPainful menstruations and others

In Ge Xia Zhu Yu Tang, Dang Gui invigorates the Blood and dispels Blood Stagnation. It also nourishes the Blood and moistens.

Read more about Ge Xia Zhu Yu Tang

Shao Fu Zhu Yu Tang

Source date: 1830 AD

Number of ingredients: 10 herbs

Formula key actions: Expels Cold and warm the menstruation Blood. Stops pain. Invigorates Blood. Dispels Blood stagnation.

In Shao Fu Zhu Yu Tang, Dang Gui invigorates the Blood and dispels Blood Stagnation. It also nourishes the Blood and moistens.

Read more about Shao Fu Zhu Yu Tang

Qing Re Tiao Xue Tang

Source date: 1576 AD

Number of ingredients: 10 herbs

Formula key actions: Expel Dampness. Relieve pain. Move Qi and Blood.

In Qing Re Tiao Xue Tang, Dang Gui harmonizes Blood

Read more about Qing Re Tiao Xue Tang

Ba Zhen Yi Mu Tang

Source date: 1624 AD

Number of ingredients: 9 herbs

Formula key actions: Tonifies Qi and Blood. Invigorates the Blood.

Conditions targeted*: Infertility and others

In Ba Zhen Yi Mu Tang, Dang Gui nourishes the Blood and thereby reinforces the action of Prepared rehmannia

Read more about Ba Zhen Yi Mu Tang

Dan Zhi Xiao Yao San

Source date: 2002 AD

Number of ingredients: 8 herbs

Formula key actions: Clears Liver Fire from Stagnant Liver Qi.

In Dan Zhi Xiao Yao San, Dang Gui works together with White peony roots (Bai Shao), the other deputy in this formula, to nourish Blood. This nourishing role also in turn helps strengthen the Liver since it stores Blood and is nourished by it.

Read more about Dan Zhi Xiao Yao San

Xuan Yu Tong Jing Tang

Source date: 1826 AD

Number of ingredients: 10 herbs

Formula key actions: Pacifies the Liver. Removes Stagnation. Drains Fire. Unblocks the Meridians.

In Xuan Yu Tong Jing Tang, Dang Gui is acrid, sweet, and warm.  It nourishes and invigorates the Blood and it supports the White peony root in harmonizing the Liver

Read more about Xuan Yu Tong Jing Tang

Gui Shao Di Huang Tang

Source date: 1706 AD

Number of ingredients: 8 herbs

Formula key actions: Nourishes Blood. Nourishes Yin.

In Gui Shao Di Huang Tang, Dang Gui nourishes Blood

Read more about Gui Shao Di Huang Tang

Di Gu Pi Yin

Source date: 1742 AD

Number of ingredients: 6 herbs

Formula key actions: Clears Heat. Stops bleeding.

In Di Gu Pi Yin, Dang Gui enters the Liver and Heart to tonify and invigorate the Blood

Read more about Di Gu Pi Yin

Da Bu Yuan Jian

Source date: 1624 AD

Number of ingredients: 8 herbs

Formula key actions: Tonifies Yin and Blood. Nourishes Qi and Yang.

Conditions targeted*: Uterine prolapse and others

In Da Bu Yuan Jian, Dang Gui nourishes Blood

Read more about Da Bu Yuan Jian

Da Ying Jian

Source date: 1624 AD

Number of ingredients: 7 herbs

Formula key actions: Tonifies Qi and Blood. Expels Cold.

In Da Ying Jian, Dang Gui nourishes Blood

Read more about Da Ying Jian

Wu Yao Tang

Source date: 1336 AD

Number of ingredients: 9 herbs

Formula key actions: Pacifies the Liver. Moves Qi. Stops pain. Nourishes Liver Blood. Eliminates Stagnation.

Conditions targeted*: Chronic pelvic inflammatory disease and others

In Wu Yao Tang, Dang Gui nourishes and invigorate Blood

Read more about Wu Yao Tang

Ren Shen Zi Xie Tang

Source date: 1602 AD

Number of ingredients: 7 herbs

Formula key actions: Tonifies Blood.

In Ren Shen Zi Xie Tang, Dang Gui nourishes Blood

Read more about Ren Shen Zi Xie Tang

Shi Quan Da Bu Tang

Source date: 1180 AD

Number of ingredients: 10 herbs

Formula key actions: Warms and tonifies Qi. Warms and tonifies Blood.

Conditions targeted*: AnemiaNervous exhaustion and others

In Shi Quan Da Bu Tang, Dang Gui enters the Liver and Heart to tonify and invigorate the Blood.

Read more about Shi Quan Da Bu Tang

Huai Jiao Wan

Source date: 1107 AD

Number of ingredients: 6 herbs

Formula key actions: Clears heat from the Intestines. Stops bleeding. Disperses wind. Regulates Qi.

Conditions targeted*: HemorrhoidsBleeding hemorrhoids and others

In Huai Jiao Wan, Dang Gui stops chronic bleeding that is caused by Qi and Blood Deficiency

Read more about Huai Jiao Wan

Zhu Yu Zhi Xue Tang

Source date: 1826 AD

Number of ingredients: 8 herbs

Formula key actions: Invigorates Blood. Stops bleeding.

In Zhu Yu Zhi Xue Tang, Dang Gui nourishes and cools Blood. Only Dang Gui's stem should be used here for a better invigorating effect. 

Read more about Zhu Yu Zhi Xue Tang

Gu Ben Zhi Beng Tang

Source date: 1826 AD

Number of ingredients: 6 herbs

Formula key actions: Tonifies Qi and Yang.

In Gu Ben Zhi Beng Tang, Dang Gui nourishes Blood and strengthen Qi. It also calms Blood. Together with Shu Di huang it helps all ingredients enter the Blood to stop bleeding.

Read more about Gu Ben Zhi Beng Tang

Key TCM concepts behind dong quai (Dang Gui)'s properties

In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), dong quai are plants that belong to the 'Tonic herbs for Blood Deficiency' category. Tonic herbs are used for patterns of Deficiency, when one lacks one of the 'Four Treasures' (Qi, Blood, Yin and Yang). Blood tonics tend to be bitter-sweet with either a Warm or neutral nature. Because the Liver stores Blood, all Blood tonics enter that Organ's Channel.

As suggested by its category dong quai are plants that are Warm in nature. This means that dong quai tend to help people who have too much 'Cold' in their body, although with less effect than a plant that would be Hot in nature. Balance between Yin and Yang is a key health concept in TCM. Those who have too much Cold in their body are said to either have a Yin Excess(because Yin is Cold in nature) or a Yang Deficiency (Yang is Hot in Nature). Depending on your condition dong quai can help restore a harmonious balance between Yin and Yang.

Dong quai also taste Pungent and Sweet. The so-called 'Five Phases' theory in Chinese Medicine states that the taste of TCM ingredients is a key determinant of their action in the body. Pungent ingredients like dong quai tend to promote the circulations of Qi and Body Fluids. That's why for instance someone tends to sweat a lot when they eat spicy/pungent food. On the other hand Sweet ingredients tend to slow down acute reactions and detoxify the body. They also have a tonic effect because they replenish Qi and Blood.

The tastes of ingredients in TCM also determine what Organs and Meridians they target. As such dong quai are thought to target the Spleen, the Heart and the Liver. In TCM the Spleen assists with digestion, Blood coagulation and Fluids metabolism in the body. In addition to regulating Blood flow, the Heart is believed to be the store of the 'Mind' which basically refers to someone's vitality. The Liver is often referred as the body's "general" because it is in charge of regulating the movements of Qi and the Body Fluids. It also takes a leading role in balancing our emotions.

Research on dong quai (Dang Gui)

Dong quai may retard the progress of renal diseases.1.

Dong quai injection can significantly inhibit platelet activation, relieve vascular endothelial cell injury, and improve microcirculation in ulcerative colitis.2.

Dong quai injection has evident therapeutic effect in treating acute cerebral infarction.3.

Astragalus and Dong quai mixture could improve the renal function of chronic kidney disease patients, elevate their plasma albumin levels, and ameliorate associated qi deficiency syndrome, blood deficiency syndrome, and yin deficiency syndrome, especially for chronic kidney disease patients of qi-blood deficiency syndrome.4.

Sources:

1. Song JY, Meng LQ, Li XM. (2008). Therapeutic application and prospect of Astragalus membranaceus and Angelica sinensis in treating renal microvascular lesions. Zhongguo Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Za Zhi. , 28(9):859-61.

2. Dong WG, Liu SP, Zhu HH, Luo HS, Yu JP. (2004). Abnormal function of platelets and role of angelica sinensis in patients with ulcerative colitis. World J Gastroenterol. , 15;10(4):606-9.

3. Liu YM, Zhang JJ, Jiang J. (2004). Observation on clinical effect of Angelica injection in treating acute cerebral infarction. Zhongguo Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Za Zhi. , 24(3):205-8.

4. Li S, Yin XX, Su T, Cao C, Li X, Rao XR, Li X. (2014). Therapeutic effect of Astragalus and Angelica mixture on the renal function and TCM syndrome factors in treating stage 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease patients. Zhongguo Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Za Zhi. , 34(7):780-5.

Use of dong quai (Dang Gui) as food

Dong quai are also eaten as food. It is used as an ingredient in dishes such as Dong Quai Chicken Soup.